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mvdernbaseball:

Real Friends // Dirty Water

i said i’m selfish, i’m a liar and i’m broken
shit runs through my head every day that i would never tell anyone
you’re just like me
the only difference is that i’m honest enough to scream my flaws
in the lines of this song

mvdernbaseball:

Real Friends // Dirty Water

i said i’m selfish, i’m a liar and i’m broken

shit runs through my head every day that i would never tell anyone

you’re just like me

the only difference is that i’m honest enough to scream my flaws

in the lines of this song

(Source: realfri-nds)


socimages:

Bathing suit fashion and the project of gender.
By Lisa Wade, PhD
I came across this ad for bathing suits from the 1920s and was struck by how similar the men’s and women’s suits were designed.  Hers might have some extra coverage up top and feature a tight skirt over shorts instead of just shorts but, compared to what you see on beaches today, they are essentially the same bathing suit.
So, why are the designs for men’s and women’s bathing suits so different today? Honestly, either one could be gender-neutral. Male swimmers already wear Speedos; the fact that the man in the ad above is covering his chest is evidence that there is a possible world in which men do so. I can see men in bikinis. Likewise, women go topless on some beaches and in some countries and it can’t be any more ridiculous for them to swim in baggy knee-length shorts than it is for men to do so.
But, that’s not how it is.  Efforts to differentiate men and women through fashion have varied over time.  It can be a response to a collective desire to emphasize or minimize difference, like the unisex pants below marketed in the 1960s and 70s.  It can also be, however, a backlash to those same impulses.  When differences between men and women in education, leisure, and work start to disappear – as they are right now – some might cling even tighter to the few arenas in which men and women can be made to seem very different.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook. View Larger

socimages:

Bathing suit fashion and the project of gender.

By Lisa Wade, PhD

I came across this ad for bathing suits from the 1920s and was struck by how similar the men’s and women’s suits were designed.  Hers might have some extra coverage up top and feature a tight skirt over shorts instead of just shorts but, compared to what you see on beaches today, they are essentially the same bathing suit.

So, why are the designs for men’s and women’s bathing suits so different today? Honestly, either one could be gender-neutral. Male swimmers already wear Speedos; the fact that the man in the ad above is covering his chest is evidence that there is a possible world in which men do so. I can see men in bikinis. Likewise, women go topless on some beaches and in some countries and it can’t be any more ridiculous for them to swim in baggy knee-length shorts than it is for men to do so.

But, that’s not how it is.  Efforts to differentiate men and women through fashion have varied over time.  It can be a response to a collective desire to emphasize or minimize difference, like the unisex pants below marketed in the 1960s and 70s.  It can also be, however, a backlash to those same impulses.  When differences between men and women in education, leisure, and work start to disappear – as they are right now – some might cling even tighter to the few arenas in which men and women can be made to seem very different.

2007_06_19unisex

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.


dear-travis:

magic-bowtie-dreams-221b:

thempress:

People look down on McDonald’s employees but fail to realize that if all these folks left McDonald’s and pursued “better careers”  your ass wouldn’t be able to get a McDouble with an Oreo McFlurry at 3am. 

You can’t demand a service while simultaneously degrading those who provide it for you. 

You can’t demand a service while simultaneously degrading those who provide it for you. 

Retail in general.


A man came to our class once,
he claimed to be a fair judge
with daughters he loved.

He asked a question to the class:
“When should a minor be tried
as an adult?”
and students began raising their hand

“murder”
he wrote it up on the board.

“robbery”
he wrote it up on the board.

I said, “Rape”
and he paused, he asked
for clarification

“You mean violent rape?”

“no I mean rape.
It is all the same.”

he looked to a boy
who said “rape only if
he used a weapon and
hurt her.”

and I said, “rape is rape,
whether his weapon is a knife,
drugs, or guilt. She said no.”

he shook his head,
and wrote
“Violent rape” on the board
anyways.

I never understood,
because you can kill somebody
quietly and peacefully with drugs,
or with guns and knives or cars;
but nobody cares if the murder was “violent”

it was still murder.

— #yesallwomen by Amanda Katherine Ricketson (via theyellowbrickroad)

(Source: -poetic)